Kerry Schafer’s Novel – Between – Takes Readers Into a Dreamworld of Suspense

Vivian Maylor is a nice girl. Unfortunately, she has met up with a broken heart after her love tells her the whole thing is off and the future TomBetweenshe expected is suddenly ripped away. Vivian chooses to head out of town in order to not have to deal with the memories, and takes a job at a hospital.

Literally, Vivian is on her own. Her only relative is her mother, who’s unfortunately mentally unstable and under care. So as Vivian sets up a new life, it is more than quiet; she feels lonesome and a bit lost most of the time. The one thing she wishes she could get is sleep, but thanks to her boyfriend (or, at least, she assumes it’s because of the stress she’s been going through over her break-up), sleep will simply not come. Of course, the sleeplessness could also come from the fact that her mother continues to ramble on about something she calls, “Dreamworlds.”

Trying to move forward, Vivian is in the ER one day when a patient begins to rant and rave about dragons; then, right before her eyes, that patient erupts into flames. All of a sudden, scientific fact begins to blur, as Vivian begins to wonder if her mother’s mythical prophecies may not be myths after all.

When Vivian is introduced to Zee Arbogast, the owner of a bookstore who gives her a book about “Dreamworlds” and tells her a crazy tale of how he’s held the book for ten years in order to give it to Vivian when she arrived in town, the myth suddenly comes to life, and all that Vivian once thought was fiction becomes glaringly factual.

Is Vivian the last in a long line of “Dreamshifters?” Let’s just say the journey is more than interesting, as Vivian does her best to learn what her fate really is and what a witch named, Johenna, has stolen that Vivian must recover.

Although there have been movies touching on the subject over time, the world that lies ‘between’ waking and sleeping is told in a brand new way with this story. Dreams may sound lovely, but this author has done a very good job showing how nightmares and danger can easily be interwoven.

Until Next Time, Everybody,

Amy